Session 11: Richard Pittman

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Richard Pittman in a win photo with judge Ann DeChant

“Whenever we were going to make a decision . . . throw out what everybody thinks and do what’s best for the breed.” – Richard Pittman about his and Terry Martin’s partnership on the ASCA Board.

I always thought I should interview Richard Pittman. Pretty much everything I’ve ever been involved with mentioned him at some point for having his finger on it. I tried to tease out all of the things he has done for this breed and for ASCA in my interview, but I know I barely scraped the surface.

Richard Pittman has done EVERYTHING. And the thing that makes him so awesome is that he has a good time doing it and I have never personally seen him get his ego behind it. I think in the dog world, that’s a big thing. Lots of people make the dog thing their whole life and a measure of their value as a person – he doesn’t.

Don’t mind the dog sounds – I sat next to him ringside at agility for this interview.

Richard Pittman flanked by fellow ASCA agility judges Sue Graham and Pamela Bryant-Meeks in 2019

He’s a character for sure – and he’s one of the many reasons I do this podcast – because a text interview just isn’t the same. Moreover, he’s so low key – I love it. He’s a voice we need to just calm ourselves down.

In this interview, we cover:

  • How he got in the breed
  • Changes over the years
  • How to dock tails
  • What it takes to become a breeder and senior breeder judge (well, for him)
  • What’s the biggest award that sticks with him after all the awards
  • Bowling for Balance
  • Changes in the conformation program – the good and bad
  • Judging with flair and character
  • How do you “breed up” to improve your dogs?

Richard Pittman’s website and kennel: Sundown

This podcast was brought to you by the generosity of Claire Thomas, of Capricorn Aussies, and ASCA Senior Breeder Judge.

If you’d like to sponsor a podcast or make a donation – you can paypal me at maculated @ gmail.com or email me about sponsorship! I have to pay someone to edit these, and it runs about $50 a session. Every little bit helps and keeps me motivated to do interviews!

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